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RIP Memoriam thread?

#821 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-August-17, 07:52

Barry the owl
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#822 User is online   sfi 

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Posted 2021-August-19, 01:11

Sean Lock

Enjoy him playing Carrot in a Box:

Round 1
The rematch
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#823 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-August-22, 18:00

Don Everly

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The most successful rock ’n’ roll act to emerge from Nashville in the 1950s, Mr. Everly and his brother, Phil, who died in 2014, once rivaled Elvis Presley and Pat Boone for airplay, placing an average of one single in the pop Top 10 every four months from 1957 to 1961.

On the strength of ardent two-minute teenage dramas like “Wake Up Little Susie” and “Cathy’s Clown,” the duo all but single-handedly redefined what, stylistically and thematically, qualified as commercially viable music for the Nashville of their day. In the process they influenced generations of hitmakers, from British Invasion bands like the Beatles and the Hollies to the folk-rock duo Simon and Garfunkel and the Southern California country-rock band the Eagles.

In 1975 Linda Ronstadt had a Top 10 pop single with a declamatory version of the Everlys’ 1960 hit “When Will I Be Loved.” Alternative-country forebears like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris were likewise among the scores of popular musicians inspired by the duo’s enthralling mix of country and rhythm and blues.

Paul Simon, in an email interview with The Times the morning after Phil Everly’s death, wrote: “Phil and Don were the most beautiful sounding duo I ever heard. Both voices pristine and soulful. The Everlys were there at the crossroads of country and R&B. They witnessed and were part of the birth of rock 'n' roll.”

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#824 User is offline   barmar 

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Posted 2021-August-24, 08:33

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Paul Simon, in an email interview with The Times the morning after Phil Everly’s death, wrote: “Phil and Don were the most beautiful sounding duo I ever heard. Both voices pristine and soulful.

The Everlys may have been groundbreaking, but Simon is being too modest -- IMHO Simon and Garfunkle had a much better sound.

But they were of different times so it might not be fair to compare them.

#825 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2021-August-24, 13:41

Charlie Watts - drummer for The Rolling Stones
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#826 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-August-25, 05:56

Bruce Springsteen said:

When Mick sings ‘It’s only rock ’n’ roll but I like it’, Charlie’s in back showing you why!

nytimes.com/2021/08/24/arts/music/charlie-watts-dead.html?te=1&nl=the-morning&emc=edit_nn_20210825


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The newly formed Rolling Stones (then called the Rollin’ Stones) knew they needed a good drummer but could not afford Mr. Watts, who was already drawing a regular salary from his various gigs. “We starved ourselves to pay for him!” Mr. Richards wrote. “Literally. We went shoplifting to get Charlie Watts.”

In early 1963, when they could finally guarantee five pounds a week, Mr. Watts joined the band, completing the canonical lineup of Mr. Richards, Mr. Jagger, the guitarist Brian Jones, the bassist Bill Wyman and the pianist Ian Stewart. He moved in with his bandmates and immersed himself in Chicago blues records.

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The Rolling Stones in 1967. From left: Mr. Watts, Bill Wyman, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Brian Jones.Credit...Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis, via Getty Images
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#827 User is offline   SamLeopold 

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Posted 2021-August-25, 22:46

Monty Hall, whose game show inspired a problem that is often used to illustrate the principle of restricted choice. Although he didn't just pass on (it was in 2017), he didn't get a post here at the time, and he would have turned 100 today. 100 is what the defenders score when the K-Q or the Q-J are doubleton.
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#828 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-August-26, 09:10

David Roberts, accomplished mountain climber and writer
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#829 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-September-06, 18:18

Michael Kenneth Williams known in the WC as Omar
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#830 User is offline   nige1 

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Posted 2021-September-16, 16:43

Clive Sinclair
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#831 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2021-September-16, 17:48

From the link above:

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Despite his involvement in computing, Sinclair did not use the Internet, stating that he does not like to have "technical or mechanical things around me" as it distracts from the process of invention.[34][35] In 2010, he stated that he did not use computers himself, and prefers using the telephone rather than email.[

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Sinclair has stated that it is unavoidable that artificial general intelligence will someday lead to human extinction: "Once you start to make machines that are rivalling and surpassing humans with intelligence, it's going to be very difficult for us to survive. It's just an inevitability."

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#832 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2021-September-19, 04:39

Jimmy Greaves, one of the greatest goalscorers in English football. Was in the squad but not the team for the 1966 world cup final having been injured in one of the group games and the coach decided not to change a winning team. His replacement Geoff Hurst scored a hat-trick.

I saw him right at the end of his career playing for Barnet, but with very little televising of games in those days, never saw a whole game of him in his heyday.

https://en.wikipedia...i/Jimmy_Greaves
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